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    Abstract
2011 (Vol. 3, Issue: 4)
Article Information:

Influence and Mechanism of Different Host Plants on the Growth, Development and, Fecundity of Reproductive System of Common Cutworm Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

H.A. Shahout, J.X. Xu, X.M. Yao and Q.D. Jia
Corresponding Author:  Hamid Shahout 

Key words:  Development, growth, fecundity, reproductive system, Spodoptera litura, ,
Vol. 3 , (4): 291-300
Submitted Accepted Published
2011 April, 23 2011 June, 10 2011 July, 20
Abstract:

The present study was aimed to explore the influence and mechanism of different host plants on the growth, development and fecundity of the reproductive system of the common cutworm S. litura to understand host suitability of plant infesting insect species to make progress in efficient strategies to control this economic pest. The influence of different host plants on larval, pupal developmental duration, adult life (longevity) and fecundity of the Spodoptera litura were investigated in the laboratory. The results revealed that the larval development was significantly (p<0.05) decreased to (15.55) days when larvae fed on cabbage while it was significantly (p<0.05) prolonged to (19.55), (20.18) days when larvae fed on cowpea and alligator weed. Pupal duration was significantly (p<0.05) reduced to (7.54) days and increased to (9.13) days when larvae fed on cabbage and alligator weed respectively. When larvae fed on different host plants adult duration (longevity) was not significantly different, only when S. litura larvae fed on sweet potato and cowpea the adult longevity was significantly (p<0.05) different and it was about (6.92), (5.64) days when larvae fed on sweet potato and cowpea respectively, Pupal weight was significantly (p<0.05) increased to (0.28) g when the larvae fed on cabbage while it was significantly (p<0.05) decreased to (0.16) g when larvae fed on cowpea. Our results found when both 1st and 3rd day age of adult female dissected ovarian length was significantly (p<0.05) increased when larvae fed on cabbage, cotton, sweet potato, while it was significantly (p<0.05) reduced when larvae fed on soybean and cowpea and alligator weed respectively. Ovarian weight was also significantly (p<0.05) influenced by the different host plants at both 1st and 3rd day age. As well as the male accessory gland length for both age was significantly (p<0.05) increased to (5.45), (5.62) cm when larvae fed on cabbage while it was significantly (p<0.05) reduced to (3.20), (3.73) when larvae fed on cowpea .the results also showed that the 3rd day age mating insects its accessory gland length was shorter. Similarly we found that the ovarian weight has the same trend for both age where the weight was significantly (p<0.05) influenced by different host plants however at the paired of 3rd day age insects the weight was lower. In addition spermary fresh weight for both age was also significantly increased to (3.23), (2.83) mg while it was reduced (2.17), (1.63) mg when larvae fed on cabbage and alligator weed respectively .Similarly the spermary weight was more reduced at the mated of 3rd day age adult .We conclude that cabbage and cotton and sweet potato were found to be more preferred for S. litura life than soybean and cowpea and alligator weed however; the implications for these findings need to be more discussed to control S. litura.
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  Cite this Reference:
H.A. Shahout, J.X. Xu, X.M. Yao and Q.D. Jia, 2011. Influence and Mechanism of Different Host Plants on the Growth, Development and, Fecundity of Reproductive System of Common Cutworm Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).  Asian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 3(4): 291-300.
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